Lamb stuffed peppers

We’ve been talking about preparing this mental recipe for years. Without further ado, I give you delicious, spicy, lamb stuffed peppers.

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cook time: 15-20 minutes

Estimated servings: 4

Ingredients:

Lamb stuffed peppers ingredients

  • One pound ground lamb
  • 4 medium-sized bell peppers (green, red, yellow or orange)
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 1 jalapeño
  • 3 green onions
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup shredded white sharp cheddar cheese
  • 4 oz. cherry barbecue sauce
  • Cilantro to taste (we used 4-6 stalks)
  • Spices to taste (we used hot honey and a dash of Rattlesnake Dust)

Instructions:

  • Preheat smoker/grill to 300°F using hardwood lump charcoal. Soak cherrywood smoking chips (this can be done up to 8 hours in advance to create the best smoke). Set up grill for indirect cooking/grilling (stone in place between charcoal fire and rack, or charcoal on either side of grill, not directly below rack).
  • In a large non-stick pan on the stove, brown the ground lamb meat. When lamb is cooked, add 1/2 diced red onion, 1/2 diced white onion, 2 diced green onions and 1 diced jalapeño. Mix well and allow vegetables to cook for a few minutes.
  • Add cherry barbecue sauce and your selected spices. Stir well to evenly disperse the flavors. Top with shredded cheeses and stir again.

Spiced lamb, vegetables and cheese

  • Divide mixture into four cored-out peppers and top with remaining diced green onion, cilantro and extra cheese if desired.
  • Grill/smoke for 15-20 minutes on a flat pan.
  • Serve hot, with a cold milk or beer.

Sliced lamb stuffed pepper

Cooking lessons learned:

We used a small amount of olive oil in the pan to brown the ground lamb. Don’t. The meat has enough natural juices that it’s not needed. We spooned all that oil into a glass before the meat mixture went into peppers.

We overestimated the amount of peppers we could stuff with this ingredient list. See that we had eight peppers prepared? We only needed four. Which was great, because we only had three eaters.

Farmgirl returns to the city

Before I write any more, I should say that this farmgirl returned to the city only temporarily

I used to work for America’s farmers and ranchers from an office in our nation’s capital. As you can imagine, you can take the girl out of the country but you can’t take the country out of her soul. I came home and bought a farm. 

This week I attended a conference in New York City, a place I had never been before, and I traveled solo. Key questions included 1) what should I wear, 2) what’s the best transportation option from the airport and 3) who will I meet? Those questions probably should have been mentally reversed but I didn’t want to stand out like I don’t belong. Even though I don’t belong. Not by a long shot. 

Where I found some mental clarity, by design I’m sure, was at the 9/11 Museum and Memorial. This was the final place I needed to visit where the planes had crashed on September 11, 2001. Underground, people rushed to work using the train systems. Above ground, trees have been planted around huge voids in the footprints of two World Trade Center towers. The difference in the two settings, within mere feet of the other, was stunning.

Trade center memorial
We, in rural America, can often feel disconnected from what happens in cities. 9/11 was something that united all of us. That’s all I have to say about that.

Museum art

What’s nice about visiting the city is that I always have several friendly faces to greet me when I return to the farm. Sheep at gate