Add a gallon of milk to your Fitbit challenge

This weekend I worked out. OK, I worked out(side). But that counts, right?

I don’t own a fitbit. I don’t eat many fruits or vegetables. I really don’t even like to walk between my farm and my parents’ farm…and we are nextdoor – country style – neighbors. But this weekend I rediscovered every single muscle while walking more than 15,000 steps per day. Sidenote: I only know this because my smart phone knows.

Why would I do this? Because we’re having spring lambs out on beautiful, green pastures that are as tall as my waist. So here’s how the workout(side) muscle discovery goes:

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Ear tags aren’t animal fashion accessories – they’re a way to trace our animals back to this farm as a way of protecting public health

My feet ache from wearing too-small, too-old rain boots.

My legs are tired from all the walking, a little running, from trudging through tall grass and uneven ground, and they ache from floating over the electric fence as carefully as possible so as not to be zapped by the current. My thighs and knees hurt from carefully supporting lambs while eartagging each one.

My arms and abs are sore from carrying lambs when it was necessary to match up moms and babies or to bring a lamb into the barn to be a bottle baby. They hurt from carrying the equivalent of a gallon of milk – all the tools we need for eartagging, banding tails and keeping good records inside of a 5-gallon bucket this season (an awkward shape to carry anyway!). They hurt from using pressure to hold down the fence with a shepherd’s crook so my sore legs could more easily cross the hot fence.

Know what feels great? Taking care of animals. Doing my job to the best of my abilities. Being trusted by my parents to handle the responsibilities of three farms while they took time away. It feels amazing to be here on the farm while juggling tasks of my usual work routine, too.

I don’t do yoga, I farm. And that’s enough for me. But if you are into fitness, I recommend adding a gallon of milk to your workout. Either in weight carried around, or drinking it as often as possible for muscle ache recovery and to increase sales for my dairy farmer friends.

 

Sheep shearing timing

We get a lot of questions about shearing our sheep. On our farm we shear ewes (mature females) before they have lambs, rams (mature males) in May with the spring lambing group and lambs at 3-4 months old. The ewes that are shorn in the winter are able to use a barn for shelter. As you can see in a photo from today’s 30 degree temperature, our sheep are still comfortable outdoors during nice weather.

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Shearing promotes the health of ewes and lambs. Their health is improved because the barn is drier, as wool can hold a lot of moisture. Shorn ewes also make nursing easier for lambs because the udder is easy to find. An added benefit is that, if shorn when the ewes come into the barn, wool is kept clean before it’s harvested.

Christmas list: wool products

A friend recently asked what I thought about someone’s reflection of why she won’t wear wool. I feel pretty fortunate to know firsthand what it takes to raise sheep with healthy lambs and wool year after year. And because of that, I will share with you what five wool items made my Christmas list this year – but first, a video from our farm so you can see for yourself the care we take for our sheep flock:

  1. Base layer tops and bottoms for doing chores in the cold
  2. Actually, add a balaclava on top – I don’t care that it is in the men’s section of this website, winter is bitter
  3. These pencil skirts for work
  4. As many sweaters as possible because, as previously mentioned, winter is bitter
  5. Socks for every occasion

“May the wool of your sheep be soft & warm,” as one of our wall hangings says.