I cleaned my house today

You guys. I finally did it. I cleaned my house.
We’re talking scrubbing floors and picking up clutter.
We’re talking sorting mail into one pile of industry magazines that need to be read. That pile, stacked neatly on my floor, reaches above my knee. Yikes.
We’re talking laundry.

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This is what laundry after stacking hay looks like. You should see the floor of my car…and then you should vacuum it for me ;)

Why is this a big deal? Because it makes me feel like a human with a normal routine. And because I’ve been putting it off since I can’t remember when. I’ve swept the barn floor more than my kitchen floor in the past season. Thankfully my neighbor cooks for me several times in a week, so my kitchen is just a room that I walk through each day on my way out. (Thanks Mom!)

You know that sign that says, “Excuse the mess, my kids are making memories?” My sign should say, “Excuse the mess, I’ve been working on the farm.” Except if I had a new sign to hang in my house it would get stacked on the table next to the paperwork that needs filing. Another day.

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Add a gallon of milk to your Fitbit challenge

This weekend I worked out. OK, I worked out(side). But that counts, right?

I don’t own a fitbit. I don’t eat many fruits or vegetables. I really don’t even like to walk between my farm and my parents’ farm…and we are nextdoor – country style – neighbors. But this weekend I rediscovered every single muscle while walking more than 15,000 steps per day. Sidenote: I only know this because my smart phone knows.

Why would I do this? Because we’re having spring lambs out on beautiful, green pastures that are as tall as my waist. So here’s how the workout(side) muscle discovery goes:

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Ear tags aren’t animal fashion accessories – they’re a way to trace our animals back to this farm as a way of protecting public health

My feet ache from wearing too-small, too-old rain boots.

My legs are tired from all the walking, a little running, from trudging through tall grass and uneven ground, and they ache from floating over the electric fence as carefully as possible so as not to be zapped by the current. My thighs and knees hurt from carefully supporting lambs while eartagging each one.

My arms and abs are sore from carrying lambs when it was necessary to match up moms and babies or to bring a lamb into the barn to be a bottle baby. They hurt from carrying the equivalent of a gallon of milk – all the tools we need for eartagging, banding tails and keeping good records inside of a 5-gallon bucket this season (an awkward shape to carry anyway!). They hurt from using pressure to hold down the fence with a shepherd’s crook so my sore legs could more easily cross the hot fence.

Know what feels great? Taking care of animals. Doing my job to the best of my abilities. Being trusted by my parents to handle the responsibilities of three farms while they took time away. It feels amazing to be here on the farm while juggling tasks of my usual work routine, too.

I don’t do yoga, I farm. And that’s enough for me. But if you are into fitness, I recommend adding a gallon of milk to your workout. Either in weight carried around, or drinking it as often as possible for muscle ache recovery and to increase sales for my dairy farmer friends.

 

What to prepare when you’re expecting…lambs

Imagine expecting 450 babies this year. If you’re a veterinarian or a farmer, you know where I am going with this. Here’s the top five things to prepare when you’re expecting…lambs.

MONTHS before the winter lambing season begins, you’re going to want to make hay when the sun shines. Vacation is nice. To save for winter. For farmer meetings, and only a few days at a time so your sheep know they can count on you to come back and feed hay. June, July, August and September in our northern climate are devoted to harvesting hay fields and some straw for homegrown feed and bedding for our ovine dependents. Store this stuff where it’s convenient to where you’re expecting lambs.

It may seem appealing to go on vacation in the summer, but there's nothing better than knowing we're prepared for a long winter and the lambs that will be born.

There’s nothing better than knowing we’re prepared for a long winter and the lambs that will be born on our farm.

Get your record book ready. No, record books aren’t just a task for 4-H youth. Keeping track of your flock records help you continue to make improvements as your business evolves. We’re still handwriting notes on each mom and baby, but I’m hoping to someday have electronic files of each animal.

Order USDA ear tags and elastrator bands (for tails and other dangling pieces you want to manage). The tags are free and the bands cost little from our friends over at Mid-States Wool Growers.

Ear tags aren't animal fashion accessories - they're a way to trace our animals back to this farm as a way of protecting public health.

Ear tags aren’t animal fashion accessories – they’re a way to trace our animals back to this farm as a way of protecting public health.

It also doesn’t hurt to have a heat lamp handy, a few plastic teats with recycled pop/water bottles and a syringe with feeding tube, in the case that you’ll have some “bonus lambs.” Most people would call these bottle lambs or orphan lambs, but I like to think of them as a small bonus. With a little extra effort on the farmer’s part, these lambs have an opportunity to be a youth project or a protein source, just like the others. And on that note, make sure you’re able to source some lamb milk replacer if needed.

Bonus lambs have potential to turn into bonus business.

Bonus lambs have potential to turn into bonus business. Isn’t my mom so cute with them?

Get the barn ready. Be sure you have enough water buckets for mothers and cut enough gates for “lambing jugs” (individual pens for new moms and babies) proportionate to your estimated amount of needed bonding-space. For instance, if we expect 90 ewes to have lambs over 3-4 weeks, 6 pens are what we prepare to be set up as needed. We then transition bonded families to “kindergarten,” where several families mingle but aren’t set free to roam the full playground yet. One other important step to get the barn ready is to shear your sheep. Wool takes up more space than you think and holds on to moisture, so promote the health of your flock by shearing.

There’s plenty more to do, but these items make my top five list. Not baaaaa-d for 450 babies, right?

Christmas list: wool products

A friend recently asked what I thought about someone’s reflection of why she won’t wear wool. I feel pretty fortunate to know firsthand what it takes to raise sheep with healthy lambs and wool year after year. And because of that, I will share with you what five wool items made my Christmas list this year – but first, a video from our farm so you can see for yourself the care we take for our sheep flock:

  1. Base layer tops and bottoms for doing chores in the cold
  2. Actually, add a balaclava on top – I don’t care that it is in the men’s section of this website, winter is bitter
  3. These pencil skirts for work
  4. As many sweaters as possible because, as previously mentioned, winter is bitter
  5. Socks for every occasion

“May the wool of your sheep be soft & warm,” as one of our wall hangings says.